Corydon Times

Justin Wyatt rocks the boat while riding an ambulance
Justin Wyatt of Wyatt Family Auction Service. Photo by Jason Selby
WAYNE COUNTY HOSPITAL EMT SAVORS A CHALLENGE, MOVING FROM PARAMEDIC TRAINING TO AUCTIONEER SCHOOL

Justin Wyatt has been a paramedic for Wayne County Hospital for 15 years. He received his EMT-B from Indian Hills Community College in 2001, later getting his EMT-I from IHCC as well. The road he traveled to get to this point—both inside the ambulance and outside—has not always been the smoothest. As Wyatt would admit, part of the problem has been internal. But he takes responsibility for his actions, something he preaches from experience to his children.

A family man now, Wyatt tries not to take the trials he faces too seriously. The trick is to not mistake indifference with callousness.

Aug 31, 2015, 08:58


Adrienne C. Thomas Auditorium opened in National Archives
Wayne County’s own Adrienne Thomas with President Barack Obama.
AT COLLEGE PARK IN WASHINGTON, D.C., HONOR BESTOWED UPON CORYDON NATIVE AFTER HER RETIREMENT IN 2011

Adrienne Thomas graduated from Cambria-Corydon High School in 1963. She recalls voting for the ‘Falcons’ in a student election to determine the mascot of the newly consolidated school district in 1960. As a cheerleader in junior high, she found it cumbersome to shout ‘Go Hornets!’ That cemented her decision.

“I wasn’t too sorry to see that go,” Thomas said. “Although my mother was, because it had been ‘Hornets’ for decades.”

Her parents were Arthur and Margaret Thomas. She first traveled to Washington, D.C. on a family trip to the East Coast.

Aug 24, 2015, 09:15


Amy Runyon-Harms remembers fondly her life in Africa
1993 Wayne graduate Amy Runyon-Harms, right, teaches the villagers of Mogitu about the science of soil.
FORMER PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER COMBINES LESSONS FROM FARM WITH DUSTY TANZANIA TO TRANSFORM HER ENVIRONMENT

Despite the level of poverty, life in Tanzania is simple, and the people are content, according to former Peace Corps volunteer Amy Runyon-Harms. She lived and served in Africa near the Serengeti for over two years. Fifteen years ago, she returned to the more complicated life of the Western world. She continues to pass on the lessons learned since childhood—from an Iowa farm to the grasslands of Africa—to people crowded into the metropolis of Denver, Colo.

“People are generally very happy,” Runyon-Harms said of her little village, Mogitu, which is not far from Mount Kilimanjaro. “Kids were having fun, they didn’t know they didn’t have access to state-of-the-art playgrounds or video games, they were content with their sticks and the little cars they made out of old oil cans.

“They were very welcoming to me. I miss the simplicity of life there.”

Aug 17, 2015, 09:09


Pat and Leroy Perkins still the electricity behind Wayne County Fair
Veteran fair organizers Pat and Leroy Perkins attend the 100th annual Wayne County Fair in Corydon. Photo courtesy of 'The Seymour Herald'
CAMBRIA-CORYDON GRADUATES PACK THEIR BAGS IN TIME FOR LEROY TO SERVE AS CHAPLAIN OF IOWA STATE FAIR

Pat and Leroy Perkins are finished with one fair. Soon, they will pack their bags and move on to the next. For them, it is a yearly ritual.

“Fairs are educational,” Leroy said. “Years ago, we didn’t have all of the college education we have now. Fairs were the instructional things for the people. They still are, but not as much because of college and higher education.

“It’s a chance for everyone to work together. You’ve got kids from Seymour that wouldn’t talk to kids from Corydon normally. They’re in competition in baseball, football, basketball and everything else. Get them to the fair, and you can’t tell which one’s which. Because they all have fun together. That’s why we enjoy it.”

Aug 10, 2015, 08:50


Georgia and Dr. Gary Runyon named Old Settlers of the Year
Georgia and Gary Runyon on their family farm. Photo by Jason Selby
OVER THE DECADES, SURVIVE CHANGES IN AGRICULTURE, MISS U.S. EMBASSY BOMBING BY ONE DAY, BUT STILL APPRECIATE LIFE IN SOUTHERN IOWA AND BELIEVE IN ITS FUTURE

Georgia and Dr. Gary Runyon moved to Wayne County on June 5, 1967. This August, the Runyons will be honored as 2015 Old Settlers of the Year.

“We loaded all our stuff in our dad’s grain truck and came to southern Iowa,” Gary said. “I wanted to go where there were cattle. When I came here, it was 75 percent hay and pasture.

“In the early 1970s, we had 40,000 beef cows in Wayne County. I knew every one personally, I think. Now, there are 15,000 cows in the county, and it’s all corn and beans and soil erosion.”

Aug 3, 2015, 13:26













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